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Meditation Private Yoga Instructor Los Angeles Santa Monica Why Do I Cry In Meditation

Published on September 9th, 2018 | by Catherine Tingey

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Why Do I Cry In Meditation

Why Do I Cry In Meditation

‘I never knew it was possible to cry with your eyes closed.’

This past week, a client told me that she had a powerful experience during the guided meditation – that it made her cry.

Private Yoga Instructor Los Angeles Santa Monica Why Do I Cry In MeditationI’ve experienced this myself before, and with clients, so today I want to talk about tears in meditation, and what they can mean.

Some experts talk about crying in meditation as a result of the eyes lubricating themselves and while this may be true, I’ve found that crying in meditation is usually accompanied by some sense of release.

Private Yoga Instructor Los Angeles Santa Monica Why Do I Cry In MeditationRelease into the present moment as you realize that there is nothing you need to do right now.

Release from burdens or stress that may have been bothering you that day.

Release from the incessant parade of thoughts in your mind.

Release from self-criticism and self-analysis.

During meditation, the brain is affected in ways that we cannot fully comprehend, despite the efforts of many leading researchers.

We know that different styles of meditation affect regions of the brain differently.

For example, meditation techniques that focus on emotion activate dialogue between the frontal lobes and the limbic system. And mindfulness practices have been shown to reduce the size/volume of the amygdala, the area of the brain responsible for ‘fight or flight.’

However, I think the most important takeaway from brain research is that meditation, of any style, induces relaxation.

Crying during or after meditation usually leaves the practitioner feeling better, despite the tears. I have never encountered a client who felt that the tears or emotions experienced during meditation caused prolonged depression. I have read that in some cases of repressed trauma, meditation should be practiced under the supervision of a therapist or psychiatrist so that is something to be aware of if you are feeling worse after meditating than before.

One of the biggest challenges after we’ve had a pleasant meditating experience is to not get attached to it. Trying to replicate our experience each time we sit is a recipe for frustration. Instead, look at meditation as an opportunity to get closer to your true self, a self unencumbered, unburdened, a self that is whole no matter what.

Meditation is not a matter of trying to achieve ecstasy, spiritual bliss, or tranquility, nor is it attempting to be a better person. It is simply the creation of a space in which we are able to expose and undo our neurotic games, our self-deceptions, our hidden fears and hopes. – Chogyam Trungpa

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Entrepreneur, yogini, designer, award-winning filmmaker, personal trainer and former marathon runner. She left a career in finance to start her own business and along the way, became a yoga teacher after practicing for 24 years.


About the Author

Entrepreneur, yogini, designer, award-winning filmmaker, personal trainer and former marathon runner. She left a career in finance to start her own business and along the way, became a yoga teacher after practicing for 24 years.



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